carbon canister delete

For those of you not faint of heart, who believe the Volvo 480 should have more torque and horsepower, find all you need to know in here.

Moderators: jifflemon, coyote1980, Rachel

Post Reply
Anadinolin
480 Newbie
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:34 am

carbon canister delete

Post by Anadinolin » Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:51 am

Hello Guys and Girls,

I have been following "1994 turbo diary" by Jay-Kay-Em after Edwin on facebook put me onto the thread!

I would like to perform my own carbon canister delete on my B18FT automatic as well, makes sense to me while i have the manifold off to paint yellow.

Has anyone got a diagram of the EVAP/carbon canister system?
which pipes do i need to keep on the manifold system, which do i block off its not entirely clear to me in the aforementioned thread?

there is a couple of these hoses that come from the automatic gearbox and lower block i imagine, nearly all of mine where brittle and broken so i have not got a great idea of where they all go!

what are the pitfalls of a carbon canister delete, what should i be aware of?

thanks in advance!
What good music needs is full deep bass to give it warmth

User avatar
Jay-Kay-Em
Knows where Volvo is from
Posts: 178
Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:42 pm
Location: Huntingdon
Contact:

Re: carbon canister delete

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Sun Nov 15, 2020 11:48 am

Hi Anadinolin,

Oh dear, what have I started!

I wouldn't purposefully champion people spending a weekend tearing off their front bumper specifically for this deletion task - it was more a case when doing a full restoration - when the carbon canister is there in front of your eyes needing repairs... why bother doing said repairs.

That was my personal project decision - but it's not one i'm campaigning because it brings X Y and Z advantages.

Apart from the eradication of vacuum lines to maintain, if they are maintained, then there are no negatives to an operational EVAP system. Polar bears agree.

The Haynes Manual chapter 4C.2 has a B18FT schematic of the evaporative emission system.

It is vacuum controlled and switched with a thermo valve on the coolant transfer pipe (engine front near oil cooler) - when 99% of other manufacturers have an electric solenoid.

There are various vacuum connection points; some to the side of the inlet manifold (adjacent to the Volvo script) and one to the throttle body. I cant comment on the auto box because mine is a manual.

For a 100% deletion, when the canister is removed - you need to be quite careful how you vent the tank gasses to atmosphere - so again, i'm not telling anyone to do this. The fuel tank still needs to breathe. If you cut the line going from the tank to the canister, you need to be mindful that petrol vapour is heavier than air (hence inspection pit warnings) so if you leave the now cut pipe somewhere, vapours could collect where you don't want them to collect. With that in mind, its much safer having the vapours going to the pot in which it was designed.

My official line; "maintain your vacuum lines.. all of them!"

Anadinolin
480 Newbie
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:34 am

Re: carbon canister delete

Post by Anadinolin » Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:19 pm

thanks for replying Jay-Kay-Em,

didn't intend to make you feel guilty or bad, its not a system i like very much as the pipes go brittle or those little rubber hoses perish underneath the fabric covers, the canister is easy to access on the vehicle i have (which is a 460) and in general it looks untidy to my eyes.

there is an element of laziness there from my part as well, because a few of my pipes have busted in various places so i no longer know the routing :rofl:

i dont know how to test the condition of my canister either, so it feels like it would be a waste of time and resources to replace the pipework in this system and then find it does not work anyway if it has any negative effects on the engine at all when malfunctioning?

im not entirely opposed to reinstating the system though
What good music needs is full deep bass to give it warmth

User avatar
Jay-Kay-Em
Knows where Volvo is from
Posts: 178
Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:42 pm
Location: Huntingdon
Contact:

Re: carbon canister delete

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Sun Nov 15, 2020 1:36 pm

Ah ok, so not a delete delete - just a cap off.

I also had my doubts of what 26 year old charcoal actually does anymore to warrant my efforts re-plumbing.

Well, the basic reply is just cap everything off except the connection points that actually need the vacuum for the car to function - the dash mounted boost gauge and the B18FT ignition/boost ECU are the only two I can think of. Stick your head up under the dash (if the 460 has the B18FT ECU in the same place) and find said vacuum line. That's the one you need to keep.

Being an automatic I am unsure if an extra vacuum line is fitted to detect kick-down. Others may be a able to assist, but it's all part of the list titled "what lines do I actually need to keep".

This capping off method would keep the nylon evap line between fuel tank and canister which is good from a safety point of view.

However, the fuel tank is still a breathing animal - it draws air in when the fuel level goes down and it pushes air out on a hot summers day. If you cap it off, that pressure/vacuum has to go somewhere. As long as you assess and deal with that risk then that's cool.

Post Reply