1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update September 2020

Here you can start a thread about your 480 days. Only the starter of the thread is allowed to fill his thread, and only one thread per person. Threads are simply a personal diary.

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cranna21
Knows an Aerodeck isn't a 480
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by cranna21 » Thu Jul 09, 2020 12:42 pm

Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Wed Jul 08, 2020 10:22 pm
cranna21 wrote:
Wed Jul 08, 2020 2:54 pm
Ignore me asking what your solution was on my thread, I did the sensible thing and came and looked!

I like your solution! something I could have done myself thanks to also requiring the chassis leg sections. interesting to see everyone's homebrew depictions of "what was Volvo thinking, why did they make my car from pastry and expect it to last, I can do this far better where's my grinder and 3mm plate" :lol:
My grandma's pastry was tougher :rofl:

Such a hostile area as its in direct line-of-fire from wheel debris.

Bit of a sneak preview now everything is powder coated, so offered it up for a test run...

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Still no idea if its all going to work!
looks better quality than mine that's for sure! my only worry is will the bar clear that bolt head?
'91 480 ES 2.0l 16v 'Williams' Conversion - 208bhp/230nm
'90 940 GL 2.0l Estate
'09 S40 D5 Manual R-Design

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Jay-Kay-Em
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Thu Jul 09, 2020 5:19 pm

cranna21 wrote:
Wed Jul 08, 2020 2:54 pm
my only worry is will the bar clear that bolt head?
Yep good spot. That leading bolt... the bolt head is turned down so it has lost 3mm - it's now a 'shallow head' bolt. This clears the bar tube.

That, and there is a sequence to fitting it all... you put the bar in first, then that leading bolt. When all finger tight, torque them all. You would need to do this with the wheels on the deck anyway so when at normal ride height, the bushes are 'at rest'.

So yes, much more awkward than yours!

cranna21
Knows an Aerodeck isn't a 480
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Location: Aberdeenshire, Huntly

Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by cranna21 » Thu Jul 09, 2020 9:45 pm

Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Thu Jul 09, 2020 5:19 pm
cranna21 wrote:
Wed Jul 08, 2020 2:54 pm
my only worry is will the bar clear that bolt head?
Yep good spot. That leading bolt... the bolt head is turned down so it has lost 3mm - it's now a 'shallow head' bolt. This clears the bar tube.

That, and there is a sequence to fitting it all... you put the bar in first, then that leading bolt. When all finger tight, torque them all. You would need to do this with the wheels on the deck anyway so when at normal ride height, the bushes are 'at rest'.

So yes, much more awkward than yours!
I think that's another perk of polybushes, not quite so fussy of being in the resting position before tightening!

I am jealous of your end product though for sure!
'91 480 ES 2.0l 16v 'Williams' Conversion - 208bhp/230nm
'90 940 GL 2.0l Estate
'09 S40 D5 Manual R-Design

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Jay-Kay-Em
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Tue Jul 21, 2020 6:58 pm

The Observations of a Number Plate Bore

:bored:

This part of the diary is optional reading... unless you are a number plate geek!

In my opinion, some cars look better on certain registrations if they are 'factory' cars.

For example;

Old Jaguars & Peugeots on a VC registration (Coventry)
Works Mk1 Ford Escorts on OO registration (Essex)
All my 1980s Vauxhall publicity photos on BM or NK registrations (Luton)

There was a period in about 1993 to 1999 that Volvo press cars were FC...

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Mxxx SFC also reminds me of other 480s too... when you have been lurking these forums for many years, you get certain plates stuck in your mind...

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Sadly my registration M592NKH doesn't fill me with Volvo nirvana and has always seemed odd because it doesn't have any consecutive brothers. When you check 590, 591, 593, 594, etc etc they are all random... Kawasaki, BMW, Mazda. Just makes no sense. Consecutive registration marks make me happy, especially when you check all the consecutive cars and they are all of the same manufacturer. It just gives me visions of the dealership forecourt on that day, August 1st, all those years ago.

So it gave me great pleasure when looking through the history file, my registration at birth was actually M458SFC by Volvo Cars UK, Wheatley, Oxon.

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They did the PDI at 19 miles...

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Then, within a year, Volvo disposed of the car and it went to its first private buyer, who applied the plate A10LLS in 1995...

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Sadly, when they removed their plate A10LLS, DVLA did not re-apply the old reg. They got M592NKH out of the DVLA tombola machine at random it would appear. This seems unusual nowadays but back then, this was DVLA normal practice i'm told.

On M592NKH by 38,000 miles...

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It feels like the car has lost a piece of its soul. I'd love to know what it did at Volvo in 1994.

I have taken inspiration from James Carruthers and the CPV launch cars. Does my memory serve me right and James wrote to DVLA to reinstate a CPV registration? Incidentally PV is Ipswich - Volvo UK (Concessionaires) was Ipswich up until 1993...

https://www.volvoenthusiastsclub.co.uk/archive.htm

I have written to the DVLA and asked for my original registration back! To 99% of people, they wouldn't give two hoots. But to me, its important. I want to reunite it with it's sister cars... not that there's any left :rofl:

No doubt in December 1994 they littered the Volvo HQ car park... poor staff being unloaded with 480s they couldn't sell :wink:

It does actually make me wonder what was at Wheatley for Volvo UK because it wasn't a dealer, and the Volvo HQ address on the back of all the brochures by 1994 was Globe Park, Bucks. Very strange.

Here's hoping DVLA...

Anyway sorry for my ramblings, normal service will resume and a work update will appear very soon!

JKM
Last edited by Jay-Kay-Em on Mon Jul 27, 2020 4:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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dragonflyjewels
480 Is my middle name
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by dragonflyjewels » Tue Jul 21, 2020 9:24 pm

Your ramblings were actually very interesting and I totally agree with you that our cars should have their original registrations. Good luck with dvla on getting yours back - I understand they are quite sympathic having seen the light and ditched the bingo machine.
The only one of our cars on a private plate is Snazzy (known as the bling car by Al). I have her original number on retention as well as the plates she was wearing when I bought her in the garage. Sadly not the originals, they advertise the dealer I got her from, but they'll go back on when I'm forced to hang up my keys.
Sylvia

Snazzy - 1993 Paris Blue ES red dipstick 2.0i bought 2001
Lethal Lily - 1991 White Turbo
hubby has
Sven - 1994 Dark Green GT
Evil Eva 1992 Paris Blue Turbo

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jamescarruthers
480 Is my middle name
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by jamescarruthers » Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:01 pm

You are right, the DVLA gave me the original registration back without any hassle at all after writing letter. I tried to make it as easy as possible for them and sent photocopies of reg transfer paperwork I found as proof. I'm sure they checked their records of course. 

Good luck with your plate request. ‎

P.S. I used to own L691 JFC which was a great Turbo when I got it and sold it. ‎I think it is sadly long gone. 
1987 Volvo 480 ES, 507274, 217 - Red (Ness)
2001 Volvo C70 2.4T convertible (Olivolvo)
2003 Renault Avantime 3.0 V6 (Big Ren)
2008 Mini Cooper convertible (Mau)

Previous 480's:
J123 CFU -- ES
J449 MNL -- ES auto
D864 CPV -- ES
L691 JFC -- Turbo
F70 MNR -- ES
H858 FGV -- Turbo auto
E981 KHM -- ES (509849)

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Jay-Kay-Em
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Mon Jul 27, 2020 9:32 pm

July 2020 - Engine Update

Hi all!

May-July 2020 progress report...

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For the 300 miles in total ownership I have driven the car - collection from Wales and juggling storage only - nothing has appeared wrong. No smoke, no coolant consumption, no noises. The car always drove nicely.

Two objectives really...

i) to make the powertrain assembly 'presentable'
ii) to capitalise on the engine being removed - for the improved access and to change anything that'll i'll kick myself for not having done!

For example... inlet/exhaust manifold nuts... struggle in the car some time in future, or address now with all the access in the world...

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For the ones that remain anyway... :shock:

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It was also alarming the amount of missing/loose transmission fixings...

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For example, this transmission bolt appeared loose. So first job, tighten. But you can't... there are a collection of bolt lengths around the bell housing, some only 5mm difference. Sadly at some point in it's life, these have been mixed up and some bolts have 'bottomed-out'. This has resulted in bolt thread damage...

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Bolt threads repaired (tidied with a metric thread file) and/or renewed. Correct locations established.

That's what you get unfortunately for a car 'professionally maintained' for 26 years. My TVR was just the same despite an amazing history folder. I shan't name & shame the clutch specialist in the 480 history folder. The only benefit is a clutch disc with plenty of thickness visible.

So, first things first... the rather tired looking warning sticker on the cambelt cover...

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My best Paint Shop Pro efforts ready for printing...

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Sent off to the printers in the first instance.

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Engine Timing

Trying to find the timing pin bolt under 26 years of grime... of which no-one has used for 26 years i'm sure!

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Timing pin installed...

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To be fair it's no surprise this hadn't been used. It’s very easy to drop the pin in to other holes - such as balance weight holes. It's also rather pointless as the flywheel has its own timing mark at 0 degrees...

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What does annoy me is that the camshaft pulley timing mark is only checkable through a hole on the outer cover... which is no good when the job requires cover removal! Anyway, checked via the cover and my own timing mark made for future ease...

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Timing belt off and removing pulleys & sprockets...

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We have an oil leak...

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Probably not that big of a deal considering this is 100k miles plus. I think the biggest culprit is open bolt holes that need thread sealant as they are a portal to the crank case / oil galleries.

The crank sprocket was particularly stubborn, had to make a plate - thankfully the sprocket has bolt holes for a puller...

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Covers & Seals

All cleaned (timing case & auxiliary case) and old sealant removed.

Overkill I know to use a 12t press, but I prefer it because it starts new seals in a square and controlled manner. Sometimes when drifting in with a hammer they start on the squiff...

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Oil Cooler

Here is the Nissens oil cooler (90697) for the Renault F9 diesel engine (Vauxhall Vivaro & Renault Trafic amongst many others). As far as my best attempts to measure go, i'd say identical... even using the same central mounting 'bolt'.

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All fitted with a genuine Volvo filter... one of the few 400 parts still available from a dealer!

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Manifolds

Turbo/Exhaust/Inlet manifolds removed.

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Stud removal via the double-nut method. Thankfully no drama's and all came out...

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All needed doing; exhaust leak evidence on old gasket...

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Not surprised with the appalling (and short in quantity) selection of manifold fixings...

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A lot of research went into my favourite stud choice. My criteria being:

a) they need to be as soft (or softer) than the head. I don't want say titanium studs harder than the head.
b) they needed a middle 'blank' section - some of the threaded holes in the head have nothing to bottom out on. Some holes even collide with the head bolts. The blank section allows a torque down.
c) they need an ability to use a torque wrench

Well, after looking at HUNDREDS of studs, not joking, I eventually found Vauxhall/Opel 24578147...

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They are perfect...

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With new gasket. The B18FT has a special gasket - even though many parts suppliers say all the B18 engines are the same. B18FT has a metal reinforced set of linked rings. These are getting rare.

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Does make me worry about B18FT longevity. This and many other parts...


Turbo Drain Hose

I don’t know if this is the original item or not, but it had gone squidgy, sticky and porous. It was like someone had used a coolant hose which is obviously not oil tolerant. Straight in the bin!

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Metal elbow removed and block mating face cleaned. Surrounding area cleaned too (including starter motor remove & reinstall). Metal elbow re-sealed and torqued.

I used a 45 degree universal silicone hose, but with an FVMQ (Fluorosilicone or just 'fluoro') internal liner specifically for oil use. Black, not blue as depicted...

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Oil Pan

24 years of grime...

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All cleaned and re-fitted...

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Aux Shaft Plug

One of the probable oil leak causes. Plug removed...

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Oil seal rock hard and no longer 'o' in section...

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New o-seal sourced...

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Turbo Oil Feed Pipe

Wasn't happy with the amount of corrosion here. A long search on the forums reveal some have pin-holed already. Not good and a fire risk.

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The corrosion area was heavily localised at the support bracket that bolts to the exhaust manifold. Obviously the heat at this location is contributory.

Even back in the day, a 2011 thread says Volvo wanted £270 for this pipe! Even if it was still available I wouldn't pay that! Custom reproduction is the only method with matching olives & adaptors.

I wanted an actual pipe and not a universal (and cheaper) braided line. It gets pretty hot around these parts!

I used Pirtek in Peterborough.

All ready for fitment....

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Extremely fiddly and time consuming as you have to custom make all the support brackets for the bare pipe...

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Oil Prime

The engine has sat oiless for two months. What follows is purely precautionary based on my experience the hard way - in as much that oil pumps don't self prime. That, and I wanted to see oil from my new turbocharger feed pipe.

Fill up with new oil. Use a drill to the auxiliary pulley via some old hose...

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Spin up & wait...

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Obviously if this didn't work, you have to back feed from somewhere until it does. Luckily didn't have to. Happy days!


Heat Shields

Not only were the heatshields filthy with grime, but they had lost their heat foil coating. This was rectified with AluTape...

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All fitted, together with the new oil return hose...

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Coolant Pump

Whilst the pump was dry externally (via the drain hole) and felt really good, it was date stamped 1994. Just makes sense to do it anyway.

I was expecting a brown mess within...

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Came off crystal clear.... amazing. Don't laugh, but the car does have a history file. I know I have swept most of the car up into a dustpan, but it must of had a good few coolant changes in its 26 years.

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A French made genuine Valeo in a nod to originality.


Thermostat

Makes sense to do... jiggle pin at the top and sourced with a new rubber o-ring...

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According to my Haynes manual (and VADIS) the B18FT has a lower opening temp. Again, many parts suppliers group all the B18 thermostats together as one. Not so.

89'c verified...

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Coolant Hoses

All hose clips junk...

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All cleaned and checked for cracks...

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Inlet Manifold

The inlet manifold to me is special. Hear me out on this one!

Re-wind 30 odd years, and that 480 brochure I talked about...

I read that brochure cover to cover as a kid, a hundred times over, and there is one picture that stands out...

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As a young lad, any engine with TURBO INTERCOOLER written on it is the coolest engine in the world!

I love the machined text contrast of the early black inlet manifold... but mine isn't an early car to have a black manifold. I think the later unpainted manifold (clearly a Volvo cost cutting measure) loses the impact of the text.

What for me is a rare deviation from factory standard, I chose slate grey as an inoffensive half-way-house. In fact I found a VHT textured grey, cleaned the manifold and masked up pipe connections...

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It gives a lovely textured finished which reminds me of that seen on red Honda VTEC cam covers....

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Does take a few days to dry though and can't be touched beforehand...

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Then oven baked @ 100'c as per instructions to cure the VHT process...

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Masked up for protection and top layer sanded...

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All done...

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Valve Clearances

Amazingly, something went well!

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All within checking tolerances... no further work required!

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Engine Damper 447758

You could push this damper in & out with ease. Might have been a contributory factor in my rear engine mount damage.

Amazingly, a good second-hand part obtained (top). This replacement takes considerable effort to push in and out, together with an audible damping effect like a shock absorber.

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The B18FT Achilles' Heel; Vacuum Valves

If you haven't got a cup of tea, go make one for this subject!

I swear this topic is the cause of many B18FT running problems. It affects everything from idle speed, crankcase pressurisation, boost pressure, power and driveability.

Below are the three vacuum/pressure valves from the B18FT charge/PCV systems. Some may recognise them already...

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We have, left to right:

1) Idle Diaphragm Valve : Volvo 3466145 (Note : this should have a long rigid plastic pipe attached but cut off for the photo)

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2) PCV Control Valve : Volvo 3451221 (Note : located on top of the oil separator)

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3) Turbo Diverter Valve (Note : located on the turbocharger air inlet pipe; also called a dump valve, re-circ valve, 710N valve, charge bypass valve) - Volvo 3430436 or Bosch 0280142102

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All three valves tested - and all three are absolute junk. Probably all original. None of them would hold a vacuum or subsequently operate.

The engine would have been leaking boost for sure, down on power, and unresponsive between gear changes. When looking back on the very little I have driven the car, I have never driven it in anger, that's probably why it was largely unnoticed. I have always driven the car to get it from storage place A to storage place B with as little drama as possible.

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Not pretty, all sludged up and all internal rubber perished...

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So, where to start with all three valves which are NLA from Volvo (obviously)?

In reverse order...

'Valve 3' - Turbo Diverter Valve - Volvo 3430436

A solution for Bosch 0280142102 is no problem. You can trace this valve (and Bosch part number) all the way back to the Ferrari F40 (1987), through 1990 Porsche 944 Turbo, evolving into the 2001 Audi BAM 225 engine and beyond; albeit with 15 consecutive Audi part numbers in between. The latest incarnation today is VAG 06A145710P. Easily available from Audi/Skoda/Seat/Volkswagen dealers for a healthy £45. Visually identical...

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Pattern valves are available - I originally purchased a 'Topran' at a fraction of the main dealer price. However, when I applied vacuum, it just didn't feel 'nice' and had an unsmooth action. The genuine, from VAG, is beautiful in operation and silky smooth.

Amazingly the Audi item, although some twenty years apart, has a location tab identical for the 480 inlet hose...

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All fitted with new JCS Hi-Torque clamps...

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This valve will now maintain boost, and open when the throttle snaps shut, maintaining turbine shaft speed between gear changes and thus driveability.

'Valve 2' - PCV control valve - Volvo 3451221

This PCV valve 3451221 is a problem. Here it is removed from it's foam housing...

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It has three important jobs;

1) It chooses a choice of two PCV vent routes dependant on driving conditions, namely inlet manifold (during idle/overrun) or pre-turbo (during acceleration).
2) It provides a one-way valve function to prevent boost back-flowing from the inlet manifold and pressurising the crank case (pushing up the dipstick commonly)
3) Controlling a maximum allowed vacuum value. Believe it or not, too much crankcase vacuum is a bad thing. For naturally aspirated engines, this isn't a problem. But for turbocharged engines, when the valve chooses the 'pre-turbo route' and the turbo inlet vane is drawing hard, it can cause too much vacuum. Excessive crankcase vacuum can create problems with oil pump suction and oil piston spray jet patterns. I read a really interesting research paper on a dyno experiment during power runs with different crankcase negative pressures and believe it or not, too much vacuum actually resulted in a slight loss of BHP. The conclusion being crankcase vacuum needs to be in that ‘sweet spot’.

Below are the testing and description slides from VADIS:

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Being no longer available new, this is when the project ground to a halt. Firstly, a second-hand part isn't viable. They are prone to failure due to age and their working environment (PCV fumes and sludge).

Many late nights trawling the internet & parts catalogues looking for other valves from other engines. I ordered 4 valves from Euro Car parts (for a collection of other vehicles) and ran tests, returning what didn't work to ECP.

I lost three weeks here. Not joking.

:wall:

Eventually, I found THIS excellent write-up by QuattroWorld.com.

It is actually written for the Audi RS2 20V... but sometimes you have to steal things from lesser vehicles ;-)

It revealed two valves...

1) a small in-line one-way valve for the inlet manifold, designed for PCV fumes, still available from VAG part number 035103245A. So I bought it...

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2) a vacuum regulation valve, VAG part number 034129101A. This is available as a pattern part from Vaico. So I bought it...

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Above is a cross-section of 034129101A courtesy of QuattroWorld.com. Note the use of a 'controlled orifice' which is exactly the same as the Volvo part. If you read the VADIS operation slide for 3451221 (earlier) then it's word-for-word in operation.

You can actually see the 'controlled orifice' that gives maximum vacuum control on full boost - basically a small hole...

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If I could include these two valves into my own PCV system, it would achieve all the three PCV objectives listed above provided by Volvo 3451221.

So that's what I set to...

It makes it easier if you purchase the T-junction (VAG 06A103247) that the one way valve 035103245A sits in...

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Cut the top off the flame-trap insulator...

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Plumb the inlet manifold anti-return line with 035103245A...

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When I have custom automotive plumbing projects I always use Yorkshire fittings as it makes good ridges for hoses...

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All measured up...

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More black, less copper...

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Plumb it all up in a way that is as close to OE looking as possible...

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So crankcase fumes get drawn up the oil separator with vacuum. Not too much vacuum as this is controlled by the vacuum limiter valve. It then has a choice.... a route to the inlet manifold with an open one-way valve, or under boost, that valve closes and the fumes go ahead of the turbo.

Below is my PCV map. The vacuum limiter valve (blue) sits on top of the oil separator (black) and the one way valve (pink cross) blocks the inlet manifold off under boost....

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So now I have a vacuum limited, one-way, boost blocking, multi-path PCV system identical to the factory design, using today's commercially available parts.

'Valve 1' - Idle diaphragm valve - Volvo 3466145

Looking at this VADIS diagram, the function of this valve is essentially a vacuum controlled one-way valve.

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I struggled to find a one way valve up to the task. I spent hours in parts catalogues, spent money on valves to test and I ran experiments using both 06A145710P & 035103245A on my Golf. None of the tests were completely successful. I either had poor starting (not enough vacuum when cranking to open the valve) or a restrictive one-way valve that would create mild 'hose crush' on the vacuum side.

Given that electronic idle speed control using the same Bosch idle control valve (ICV) was fairly generic in the 1980's, I looked at what other manufacturers did and what one-way-valves they used for turbocharged applications. Truth is, they didn't bother, because in all the vehicles I checked, only the B18FT takes idle air from the pre-turbo side. All the period turbo cars I checked, idle control air is taken post-turbo. So, under a boost situation, there is no need for a one-way valve, as pressure is balanced either side of a wide open throttle. So, if I did the same, I wouldn't need to source a one-way valve replacement for 3466145. Then, I made a discovery... in 1993 Volvo changed the inlet system from this simple setup post-turbo, to a more complicated set-up pre-turbo. My best efforts in a diagram, below, explains...

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• Top is my factory setup, post 1993; the valve I am trying to source is circled. Bottom is the early pre-turbo setup up to 1993.

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• The parts catalogue also shows the idle control valve take off point on the intercooler hose (circled; post-turbo obviously) which was deleted post chassis 567599.

I think this post-1993 revision was to stop inlet air with oil vapours going through the ICV and gumming it up. Indeed, some references I read on VADIS called 3466145 an "anti-sludge valve". Volvo obviously had problems with the ICV gumming up and flipped the air intake pre-turbo for fresher, cleaner, non-PCV contaminated air. As far as I am aware, the B18FT is the only turbo car to do this; but i'm happy to be corrected... but you'll also have to provide their one-way-valve solution if you disagree!

The more I research the B18FT, the more 'extreme measures' I find that can only be due to the cold weather testing demands of Volvo and an utter phobia of unreliability - the latter having some irony :rofl:

So very long story short, and it took me considerable time to figure it all out, but basically I will modify the ICV circuit to a pre-1993 setup, thus eliminating the unobtainable diaphragm valve 3466145.

When the time comes, I will either obtain a second-hand 'early' intercooler hose 3430838, or tap my own take-off point.

If this is your chosen method, remember to now block off the now redundant pre-turbo take off point.

All intake hoses cleaned...

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Redundant pre-turbo take off point for 3466145 terminated...

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Talking of extreme cold weather testing, the PCV hose is insulated AND heated! I think Volvo wanted to avoid frozen PCV condensate hitting the turbo impellor vanes. Amazingly, I put the PCV heater across a battery and it still works, becoming warm to the touch. I have no doubt it is original, so that’s a small miracle.

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Insulated foam hose looking shabby...

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Shabbiness sealed within big-bore heat shrink...

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Here endeth my knowledge on B18FT vacuum valves 1, 2 & 3. The vehicle, at this glacial rate of progress, will not be driven for many months to come. If it has any changes, I will edit this thread accordingly!


Ignition System

New rotor arm, cap and interestingly, backing shield. My backing shield was broken and someone had tried a repair with silicone (?!)...

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Not all distributor cap kits come with it. I found this backing shield for the equivalent F engine Renault Laguna made by FACET...

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NGK plugs. I have fitted NGK for 25 years now, and that recommendation was passed down to me from my apprentice 'mentor' back in the day.

All gapped to 0.8mm...

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I try to read as much as possible from old spark plug condition, like reading someone's palm! Happy with these...

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New Bosch HT lead set...

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With my zip-tie separators...

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New genuine Bosch knock sensors still available. The same sensor 0261231046 is hugely popular across many cars...

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Timing Belts & Pulleys

Powder coated backing cover fitted, pulleys torqued and new belt fitted...

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Trust me, it would get the old "quarter turn tension check" if the engine was installed within the engine compartment! But as I have the luxury of space, I used the "official Volvo method"...

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30 Newtons should give a 7mm deflection (on a cold engine). Guess what, it feels and looks just the same as a quarter turn!

Outer covers fitted, bottom pulley torqued, placed back on to the trolley...

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Hopefully objective met of it being a bit more presentable.

Pushed into the corner for refitment one not-too-distant day, covered with a dust sheet...

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That's it... sorry it has taken so long. Attention turns to the body again.

I have this lot to install... :eek:

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Until the next update; best wishes.

JKM

jifflemon
480 Is my middle name
Posts: 1507
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 11:03 am

Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by jifflemon » Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:27 am

Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 9:32 pm

So, first things first... the rather tired looking warning sticker on the cambelt cover...

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My best Paint Shop Pro efforts ready for printing...

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Sent off to the printers in the first instance.

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Great minds think alike eh?

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A seriously impressive build, am loving it!

Excellent work on the PCV valves too, that'll probably find itself being quoted a few times! Actually tempted to pull that out and turn it into a "how-to" if you don't mind?

Alan 480
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update July 2020

Post by Alan 480 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:52 pm

very impressive and attention to details.

i simply painted the inlet manifold with lots of paint to 'flow' and then buffed off to leave text, the other one I painted the text (carefully)

timing mark added as you did

and on the SS1 numerous 'yorkshire fittings' sod the purists as these are made from rubbish mild steel (in Reliant) if you can get them
Alan

480 ES 2litre x 2, C30 1.8ES, SS1

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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Tue Jul 28, 2020 8:26 pm

Thanks guys
jifflemon wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:27 am
Actually tempted to pull that out and turn it into a "how-to" if you don't mind?
No worries Jeff if it gets your thumbs up; I'm sure it will be OK but i'd like to drive it first. Want to make sure it idles ok, pulls hard and nothing leaks. Probably four months as yet until a drive to the paintshop... via a pre-booked MoT of course... with no interior, glass or lights :shock:

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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update July 2020

Post by jifflemon » Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:27 am

One other thought whilst you've got engine access...

Change the starter motor. :eek:

Also, check the pivot point on the clutch arm - Ade had a post about it somewhere.... I'll see if I can find it.

Edit: Post is here

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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update July 2020

Post by dragonflyjewels » Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:29 pm

jifflemon wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:27 am
Change the starter motor.
Or get the original Volvo one rewound - I was told they are better quality. We had Lily's done by Just Alternators and Starter Motors on James' recommendation and very happy with them.
Sylvia

Snazzy - 1993 Paris Blue ES red dipstick 2.0i bought 2001
Lethal Lily - 1991 White Turbo
hubby has
Sven - 1994 Dark Green GT
Evil Eva 1992 Paris Blue Turbo

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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update July 2020

Post by Robou » Tue Aug 04, 2020 11:55 am

Your report about rebuilding the engine is very interesting, particularly the part about the valves as it reveales things I should have known years back.

When I advised people about the dump valve it was evident to name the 06A145710P as, in contrary to the original, it has a metal interior and the small difference in openening pressure was even advantageos. Moreover, many of the ones in use weren't working properly causing strange effects and turbo damage especially with people trying to get quicker from A to B than you do.

The crankcase breather, well, they were advised to check the one-way function of the valve and eventually replace it by something like used in a windscreen washer. But I never realized there was more to it. The original non-return valve used to be rubbish, a squishy orange rubber part in the outlet to the manifold. Thank you for all the time you spent in finding out the specifics and replacements. In due time they'll be in my car, the costs are negligible.

Whatever reason for changing the inlet point for the idle control valve, it cost money, so probably it was well thought out. Btw my car, crossover from 1991, is equipped with what you call post-1993, and with due respect for your decision I keep it as is. As replacement for the valve often a dump valve is mentioned.

Your research was very worthwhile, thanks.
Too old to bother
480 Turbo midst '91

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1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update September 2020

Post by Jay-Kay-Em » Sat Sep 26, 2020 4:32 pm

Hi all!

Another diary entry...

A trip to "Hull & Back"...

Via a 480 meet-up... said Hi to Nilani (and Martin of course!)...

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My tow bar subsequently donated for adventures new...

Then, finally, after a 7 month search, a hole-free carpet obtained from TJ Volvo Spares near Leven (Hornsea)... and I have cannibalised yet another Celebration. Sorry N605DRH. That's seats AND a carpet now from two different Celebs...

I don't mean to be a Celeb cannibal :twisted:

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It's a filthy dirty carpet naturally, but importantly no driver footwell holes. A good VAX will see it right... one for the interior update...

Interior tasks still seem an age away sadly :cry:

Anyway, back to the main agenda...

September 2020 - Underside - Fluids & Pipes

Braking System

Following the forced decision of ABS removal from a previous update.

More ABS unnecessaries cut from the harness...

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Cross referred to the later ABS bulletin for facelift cars - every wire cut accounted for to make sure no other systems affected...

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All to go into the '480 originality box' up in the loft, together with the modulator, pump and what remains of the ABS wheel speed sensors.

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Re-fitment of the servo and master cylinder and a peak inside the reservoir...

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All sorts of gunk and general badness within :shock:

This forced a strip and clean...

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Then, due to ABS/TRACS removal, there are two redundant take-off ports on the reservoir...

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Terminated...

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Front Anti-roll Bar

This has to go in first because the routing of pipes etc.

You need to know where this sits to route accordingly.

All powder coated and new bushes from Skandix...

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All fitted and torqued down...

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Brake Pipes

Full set of TRW Hoses...

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...with powder coated brackets on a trial fit...

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Then out comes my old, but faithful, SP Pipe Flare Kit...

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These are good... little pipe holder clips...

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Because all my pipework where the ABS modulator would be is new, the odd clip just makes it the more stable and OE looking...

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Master cylinder lines all made up...

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Powder coated heatshields all fitted...

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With sufficient brake line clearance...

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Here are my 'recycled' rear bias valves for a diagonal split...

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Really difficult to do OE-looking straight runs when brake pipe is supplied in coils, but you do your very best...

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Up and over the rear panhard beam....

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All brake lines now complete with a diagonal split and in-line rear brake bias pressure control.

All ready for the suspension build-up, calipers and a bleed.


Fuel System

Fuel filter connections not looking pretty...

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Time for nylon fuel line repairs. Basically everything to be terminated in 8mm barb connections for Gates hose.

Cut and heat the line (with a hair dryer hot enough to be pliable, but not melt!)...

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Secure the connector in a stable base, heat and lubricate with soapy water...

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Then you just got to go for it, one hit, before it cools, no messing about!

Terminated with single-ear clips...

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I then converted my OE filter with 8mm barb connections...

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Fuel tank clean to remove 25+ years of crud...

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Assessment of lines and clips not great...

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Strip down required...

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And not before time either...

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All replaced with 'fuel friendly' hose where needed.

This is a photo I took before cleaning. That is the return line entry....

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The unions are so tight upon removal, cracking the fuel pump head is difficult to avoid. I looked around on eBay and had a look at a few pump heads, but they are at risk of the same fate. Whilst this decision may come back to bite me, on balance, I think the best way forward is to repair.

The only saviour is that this is the return line so running at lesser pressures. That, and it looks like there is an internal tube, so the white plastic is not fuel retaining.

I used QuikSteel Epoxy Tank Repair Resin...

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You cut a length, knead in your hand until it becomes warm and apply...

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I tried to make it look as smart as possible, it has dried hard as nails and is designed to be fuel safe so watch this space!

Fuel tank and filler neck raised and fitted with powder coated straps and stainless bolts for an inevitable future removal...

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Powder coated fuel filter bracket fitted with the correct Volvo rubber bushes...

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More copper pipework required to do a sharp 180 degree turn. You can get 8mm copper fittings (with my preferred Yorkshire termini) for LPG. Typically used for motorhome/caravan fit outs.

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All fitted, Bosch filter and Gates EFI hose...

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Evaporative Emissions Line

With carbon canister deletion I had to terminate the vapour line. I put a little air filter on the end and secured up out the way. This can now vent to atmosphere. Sorry Greta. I was going to install a roll-over valve, but the later fuel tank already has a roll over valve in the expansion chamber adjacent to the filler neck. I tested this when the tank was out.

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Engine Mount (Rear)

Some may remember this minor disaster from last year...

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The base plate had torn from my rear engine mount.

So; how to replace a broken rear engine mount 3466003, when fully discontinued?

This engine mount was also made by aftermarket supplier FEBI (part number 22645) at a healthy £147 once upon a time.

I have had an "eBay Saved Search" on all these part numbers for a year now, with absolutely nothing returned, aftermarket or otherwise. Time is slowly running out and engine re-installation in getting close.

I downloaded a PDF catalogue from Corteco with a picture guide for over 700 engine mounts...

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There was one clear winner...

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Cotreco catalogue crossed referred to Quinton Hazell EM4219. For Citroen C5 and Peugeot 407 etc.

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I'm not too excited because it has the following shortfalls:
  • It isn't a hydro-mount like the original (so increased NVH issues).
  • In it's designed-for application, it's an offside upper engine mount. The engine hangs off it, in the timing belt area, and forces are a twist moment. For the 480 application as a rear mount, under acceleration, the mount will purely be in compression and then stretched in over-run. So basically, i'm not using the mount as designed.
  • It uses M8 fixings (x2) to bolt down and not M10 as per the original. This is a clue to its designed strengths not being so high.
Given the above, I have no idea how long it will last, or how it will drive. Like most things in this diary, including all my PCV work from the last update, none of this will be tested until driven sometime in 2021.

On the plus side, it is super cheap, plentiful and dimensionally very similar...

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It does need a little chasing out, but nothing major...

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Positioned and ready for torque-down...

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I'll still keep my "eBay Saved Search" for 3466003, you never know.

Engine Mount (Rear) Bracket

You may also remember that the bracket for this engine mount was found fractured...

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I plan to cut out the fractured part and install a thicker piece, with a curved rib reinforcement...

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:shock:

New section welded in...

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Drilling for the engine mount stud...

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All done and ready for powdercoat (2nd batch)...

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Front Bumper Support Brackets

These are the little brackets, quantity 3, that bolt under the radiator support bracket and secure the front bumper.

Again, I have kept my eye out for replacements on every scrapped 480 I have cannibalised. All have been just as rotten. Many have turned to dust and fallen off years ago!

Given that i'm creating a powdercoat second batch, I needed to fabricate my own. Thankfully one had survived to use as a template...

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And Still it Fights Me...

Stripping all the offside inner wing parts for cleaning and powdercoat (power steering reservoir etc.) and still it fights me!

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Drilled out, captive domes welded and ready for schutz...

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That's it for now... suspension rebuild to follow next month. Bolting on new bits is the enjoyable part!

Best Regards

Jay. :crazy:

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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update September 2020

Post by Alan 480 » Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:37 pm

that rear engine mount will probably be Ok as it is in compression most of the time?

and at low cost , easy availabilty then its worth a shot :hopping:

Only comment is to use allen headed bolt for the offside one so that it can be undone whilst the engine is in the car as you can 'just' reach it with a ball ended hex-drive, long variety and use a ring-spanner to give the extra torque :-0 not much room! I guess even less on a Turbo, so numerous extensions/flexible joints?
Last edited by Alan 480 on Sat Sep 26, 2020 8:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Alan

480 ES 2litre x 2, C30 1.8ES, SS1

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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update September 2020

Post by dragonflyjewels » Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:50 pm

Then, finally, after a 7 month search, a hole-free carpet obtained from TJ Volvo Spares near Leven (Hornsea)... and I have cannibalised yet another Celebration. Sorry N605DRH. That's seats AND a carpet now from two different Celebs...

I don't mean to be a Celeb cannibal
Now I know why I didn't get the carpet he promised me !! Don't suppose you got the Celeb's chassis no for the register ? He promised me that as well......
Sylvia

Snazzy - 1993 Paris Blue ES red dipstick 2.0i bought 2001
Lethal Lily - 1991 White Turbo
hubby has
Sven - 1994 Dark Green GT
Evil Eva 1992 Paris Blue Turbo

jifflemon
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Re: 1994 Volvo 480 Turbo Diary - Update September 2020

Post by jifflemon » Sat Sep 26, 2020 9:07 pm

Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Sat Sep 26, 2020 4:32 pm
Really difficult to do OE-looking straight runs when brake pipe is supplied in coils, but you do your very best...

Image

Image
I tend to use one of two methods. If it's a really long length, cut pipe with excess. Clamp one end tight in vice, mole grip the other end, then using your best BFH, smack mole grips. Voila! One long, straight length.

For smaller stuff, you can get a special tool but a block of wood with a suitable sized hole drilled in it works just as well!
Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Sat Sep 26, 2020 4:32 pm
I then converted my OE filter with 8mm barb connections...

Image
One thing to consider (and it's an observation, not criticism!), but think ahead to fuel filter change time. The idea of those awful unions, is that when they're working correctly, you can spin off the union, without twisting the hose.

Obviously, some people just think its a "keep on turning it" game, and you end up with this to resolve...

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But that's a different story!

I suppose having jubilee clips means you could unscrew and in theory the hose could spin on the barb.
Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Sat Sep 26, 2020 4:32 pm
Image

The unions are so tight upon removal, cracking the fuel pump head is difficult to avoid. I looked around on eBay and had a look at a few pump heads, but they are at risk of the same fate. Whilst this decision may come back to bite me, on balance, I think the best way forward is to repair.

The only saviour is that this is the return line so running at lesser pressures. That, and it looks like there is an internal tube, so the white plastic is not fuel retaining.

I used QuikSteel Epoxy Tank Repair Resin...

Image

You cut a length, knead in your hand until it becomes warm and apply...

Image

I tried to make it look as smart as possible, it has dried hard as nails and is designed to be fuel safe so watch this space!
Great minds think alike - I've the exact same repair to do on Britneys pump housing, and I bought the exact same stuff!
Jay-Kay-Em wrote:
Sat Sep 26, 2020 4:32 pm

Front Bumper Support Brackets

These are the little brackets, quantity 3, that bolt under the radiator support bracket and secure the front bumper.

Again, I have kept my eye out for replacements on every scrapped 480 I have cannibalised. All have been just as rotten. Many have turned to dust and fallen off years ago!

Given that i'm creating a powdercoat second batch, I needed to fabricate my own. Thankfully one had survived to use as a template...

Image
Have I mentioned my mate now has a CNC plasma cutter, as well as all the usual folding and fabrication stuff? Just a thought!

In summary - Superb update!

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